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BIOLOGY / IMPORTANT SCIENTIST AND THEIR WORK 

Important Scientist And Their Work

Robert Hooke
1665
Discovered cells for first time in cork slice with the help of primitive microscope.
Leeuwenhoek
1674
Discovered free-living cells in pond water by his improved microscope.
Robert Brown
1831
Discovered nucleus in cells.
Schleiden and Schwann
1838-1839
Presented cell theory,which states that all plants and animals are composed of cells and the cell is the basic unit of life.
Purkinje
1839
Coined the term ‘protolasm’ for the fluid substance of cell.
Rudolf Vichow
1855
Expanded the cell theory by suggesting that all cells arise from pre existing cells.
Knoll and Ruska
1940
Built an Electron Microscope that made understanding of the complex structure of cell and its organelles possible.

ROBERT HOOKE

Robert Hookewas one of a special breed of scientist whose intellect and ingenuity spanned many different disciplines. Like his contemporaries Isaac Newton(1642-1727) and Christian Huygens, Hooke worked in many fields, often with remarkable results.

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Hooke was born in Britain, on the Wight in 1635. A sickly child who was stricken with small pox at an early age, he was not expected to survive more than a few years. His persistent ill health forced him to remain indoors, where he found amusement in taking apart and reassembling mechanical devices. By his tenth birthday he had become adept at constructing intricate mechanical toys, including working boats and clocks.

After his father’s death in 1648, Hooke was sent to London to attend boarding school, where the headmaster recognized his potential and placed him in a curriculum that included Latin, Greek, and mathematics. Hooke attended Oxford in 1653. Though he never completed his bachelor’s degree, it was at Oxford that Hooke met some of Britain’s greatest scientists, around whom the British Royal Society would later form. Among these was the physicist Robert Boyle, for whom Hooke served as a laboratory assistant.

VAN LEEUWENHOEK

Van Leeuwenhoek, whose birth 384 years ago Monday in Delft, Netherlands, is being honored in an animated Google doodle. He is commonly known as the father of microbiology and widely considered the first microbiologist. He was first to observe and describe microorganisms, which he originally referred to as animalcules.

ROBERT BROWN

Robert Brown, a botanist, collected, studied and classified thousands of plant flora he collected from the Flinders expedition to Australia in 1801 – 1805. He described Brownian motion, the movement of small particles in solution, which is named after him and he described and named the plant cell nuclei.

THEODOR SCHWANN

Theodor Schwann 7 December 1810 – 11 January 1882) was a German physician and physiologist. His most significant contribution to biology is considered to be the extension of cell theory to animals. Other contributions include the discovery of Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, the discovery and study of pepsin, the discovery of the organic nature of yeast, and the invention of the term metabolism.

JOHANN EVANGELIST PURKINJE

Jan Evangelista Purkyně (Czech: also written Johann Evangelist Purkinje) (17 or 18 December 1787 – 28 July 1869) was a Czech anatomist and physiologist. In 1839, he coined the term ‘protoplasm’ for the fluid substance of a cell. He was one of the best known scientists of his time. Such was his fame that when people from outside Europe wrote letters to him, all that they needed to put as the address was “Purkyně, Europe”.

Read More: CLASSIFICATION OF PLANTS AND ANIMALS

RUDOLF VIRCHOW

Rudolf Ludwig Carl Virchow was a German physician, anthropologist, pathologist, prehistorian, biologist, writer, editor, and politician. He is known as “the father of modern pathology” and as the founder of social medicine, and to his colleagues, the “Pope of medicine”. He received the Copley Medal in 1892.

KNOLL AND RUSKA

Knoll was born in Wiesbaden and studied in Munich and at the Technical University of Berlin, where he obtained his doctorate in the Institute for High Voltage Technology. In 1927 he became the leader of the electron research group there, where he and his co-worker, Ernst Ruska, invented the electron microscope in 1940.

SCIENTIST AND THEIR WORK

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